Gardens of War  Life and Death in the New Guinea Stone Age  by Robert Gardner and Karl G. Heider
Gardens of War by Robert Gardner and Karl G. Heider
Gardens of War by Robert Gardner and Karl G. Heider
Gardens of War by Robert Gardner and Karl G. Heider
Gardens of War by Robert Gardner and Karl G. Heider
Gardens of War by Robert Gardner and Karl G. Heider
Gardens of War by Robert Gardner and Karl G. Heider
Gardens of War by Robert Gardner and Karl G. Heider
Gardens of War by Robert Gardner and Karl G. Heider
Gardens of War by Robert Gardner and Karl G. Heider
Gardens of War by Robert Gardner and Karl G. Heider
Gardens of War by Robert Gardner and Karl G. Heider
Gardens of War by Robert Gardner and Karl G. Heider

Gardens of War by Robert Gardner and Karl G. Heider

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Gardens of War

Life and Death in the New Guinea Stone Age

by Robert Gardner and Karl G. Heider

Penguin Books, 1974, ISBN 0140037993, colour and black and white photographic plates, black and white photographic frontispiece, paperback

Good Condition, some edge and shelf wear, some rubbing and bumping to edges and corners, ex-library with some scuffing, creasing, re-enforced spine, sticker residue, stamps to title page and inside back cover, sticker to inside back cover (see photographs)

“Gardens of War is the first photographic record of a Stone Age tribe of Neolithic warrior farmers who live in the Central Highlands of New Guinea.  At the time the photographs were taken, the people – the Dugum Dani – were virtually untouched by any form of civilisation.
In 1961 the Film Study Center of Harvard University’s Peobody Museum mounted an expedition to record this untouched world.  This remarkable collection of photographs of a Stone Age culture destined to disappear is the result.
The author’s essays on this vanishing society illuminate the magnificent photographs; but as Dr Margaret Mead points out, ‘Gardens of War is a book for those who enjoy looking … at scenes that they themselves are most unlikely to see.  It is unique.’”